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  • The Bain of Our Existence
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The Bain of Our Existence

March 2nd, 2015

Bain from STE 1874 Latimer Clark donation cropped

As is the case for most technologies, television had no single “inventor.” But then there’s the amazing Alexander Bain.

Consider: 1939 August 26 Reds v. Dodgers at Ebbets mobile unitThe first major-league baseball game to be televised was played between the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers on August 26, 1939. If one believes that television was introduced at the New York World’s Fair that year a few months earlier, it didn’t take long to get from that introduction to sports coverage. In fact, there was even experimental coverage of a game between Princeton and Columbia Universities on May 17.

1931_Nov-Dec_TV_NEWS - Japan Baseball coverOf course, that’s a very U.S.-centered view of history. Regularly scheduled television broadcasting began in London in 1936 (or even earlier, depending on definitions). As for the first baseball game to be televised, that was in Tokyo in 1931.

Even in the U.S., 1931 saw the first TV shows with original scripts. Regularly-scheduled news telecasts began in Schenectady, New York in 1928. In London, the first public demonstration of a television system capable of depicting a recognizable human face was in 1926, and the first public demonstration of a cruder television system was in 1914.

eyeSiemens10An all-electronic television system was described in the publication Nature in 1908, following the patenting of an electronic picture display in 1907. The word television, itself, was coined in 1900 to describe the many moving-image transmission systems created by that point.

What has been called “the master television patent” — certainly the first patent for a complete television system — was issued in Germany in 1885. The first crude television pictures were seen by 1879. Multiple television systems were described between a demonstration of an “artificial eye” in 1876 and those first crude video pictures of 1879. And before that?

Nothing. Not even science fiction or fantasy. The closest description might be in a tale, offered by Sir Walter Scott in 1828, of a mysterious mirror that saw not only into the distance but also into the past (although it could produce images for no more than seven minutes).

Why did the concept of television suddenly appear in the 1870s? It began, perhaps, with the seemingly appropriately named Wildman Whitehouse.

AgamemnonIn one version of a common joke, a surgeon with a defective lamp calls an electrician, who arrives, works for a moment, fixes the lamp, and presents a bill. “This is outrageous!” the surgeon declares. “I’m a surgeon, and I don’t get paid as much as that.” The electrician replies, “When I was a surgeon, I didn’t get as much, either.”

Whitehouse was a surgeon who became an electrician. As the latter, he came up with a plan to use high voltage to force telegraph messages through the long transatlantic cable of 1858. Whether it was that high voltage or, as later research suggests, flaws of manufacture, the cable failed.

Willoughby Smith imageSo, for its replacement, telegraph engineer Willoughby Smith designed an apparatus to monitor its health. But Joseph May discovered unusual variations in its readings, seeming to have something to do with light intensity. Smith conducted experiments to prove that the selenium resistors used were photoconductive and wrote to Latimer Clark about it in 1873. Clark informed the Society of Telegraph Engineers (STE), to which he, May, Smith, and Whitehouse all belonged, along with such other notables as William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin, for whom the K in “3200K” is named) and William Siemens. After much debate and publicity, the Siemens artificial eye appeared, followed by many television proposals. As for the STE, they became the Institution of Electrical Engineers, today the Institution of Engineering and Technology, one of the six partners who produce the International Broadcasting Convention (IBC) each year.

Many television histories begin with May’s discovery or Smith’s experiments, and there’s no question that, as publicized by the STE, they kicked off the efforts to create television. What’s odd, however, is that they weren’t the first. Long before even the first transatlantic cable, in 1839 Edmond Becquerel published in the journal of the French Academy of Science his research that sunlight could create an electrical current. At the time, it seemed just another interesting scientific phenomenon. No one made the leap from that to television.

Bain Wick plaqueThe reason television research began after May/Smith/Clark and not Becquerel is that, by the time of the discovery of the photoconductivity of selenium, the world was already accustomed to image transmission, and the reason for that was Alexander Bain. There were actually two famous Alexander Bains born in Scotland in the early 19th century. The one who might be considered the father of television (and almost all other forms of electronic imaging) was born in Watten in 1810 and apprenticed to a clock maker in Wick. After hearing a lecture about electricity, he abandoned his apprenticeship and went off to work in the new field.

He worked in both telegraphy and timekeeping, sometimes combining the two. In 1843, while living in London, he received a patent for “Certain improvements in producing and regulating electric currents, and improvements in electric time pieces, and in electric printing and signal telegraphs.” He later said he came up with the idea in 1842. A drawing from his 1848 U.S. patent (5957) is shown below.

Big Bain patent

Bain appears to have been the first to conceive of image scanning. In one fell swoop, he came up with linear (horizontal) scanning lines, pixels, line synchronization, and frame synchronization, all for image transmission. As John Douglas Ryder and Donald G. Fink (the latter the secretary of the U.S. National Television System Committees, NTSC) put it in their 1984 IEEE Press book Engineers & Electrons: a century of electrical progress, Bain’s “concept embodied all the geometrical and timing methods of the modern television system.”

Bakewell-Tape-1850 trimmedJust as the 1873 announcement of the photoconductivity of selenium opened the floodgates for television proposals, Bain’s patent 30 years earlier brought on a flood of proposals for what we might today call fax machines. At right is an image transmitted a long distance in 1850 using a system that created negative images at the receiver.

Caselli_pantelegraph_imageCommercial fax service began in France in 1865 using Bain’s scanning technique. The biggest problem was that the faxes had to be drawn or written with insulating ink. That didn’t stop opera composer Gioacchino Rossini from transmitting a page of music from Paris to Amiens in 1860. By 1863, faxes were even transmitted in color! But some sort of system for converting variations in light intensity to electrical signals was seemingly necessary to transmit photographic images, and that’s what the May/Smith/Clark 1873 announcement of the photoconductivity of selenium offered.

The fundamental concepts of television were then in place: image scanning and the conversion of light variations to electrical signals. It was already known that wires would glow at different brightnesses depending on the amount of current flowing through them. The rest was just engineering.

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Sensor-Lens Options for 4K Acquisition

February 25th, 2015

Recorded at the 2015 HPA Tech Retreat, Hyatt Regency Indian Wells, CA February 12, 2015 Are “4K” cameras really 4K? Is de-bayering a form of upconversion? Why should lenses be different for HD and 4K? Why are higher-resolution image sensors usually bigger than HD sensors? Was there ever a real 4K camera? Mark Schubin provides a […]

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Technology Year in Review

February 18th, 2015

Annual Technology Year in Review recorded at the 2015 HPA Tech Retreat, Hyatt Regency Indian Wells, CA February 11, 2015 Direct Link (13 MB / 10:36 TRT): Technology Year in Review Embedded:

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Everything Else

February 11th, 2015

Recorded at the HPA Tech Retreat Super Session, Hyatt Regency Indian Wells, CA February 10, 2015 The moving-image media are now all file-based and post-produced — except, that is, for news, sports, and live events ranging from awards shows to zoo births, with art-exhibit openings, ballet, concerts, opera, and theater thrown in.  Even in movie […]

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Understanding Frame Rate

January 23rd, 2015

Recorded on January 20, 2015 at the SMPTE Toronto meeting. In viewing tests, increased frame rate delivers a greater sensation of improvement than increased resolution (at a fraction of the increase in data rate), but some viewers of the higher-frame-rate Hobbit found the sensation unpleasant. How does frames-per-second translate into pixels-per-screen-width? One common frame rate […]

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UHD: Beyond the Hype

January 5th, 2015

Recorded November 12, 2014, NAB’s CCW+SATCON, Javits Convention Center, New York. With CES 2015 beginning tomorrow, Mark Schubin asks: What do viewers appreciate most about UHD? Higher resolution, frame rate, dynamic range? Wider color gamut? More immersive sound? What do those mean for production, post, and distribution? Can more become less? Follow the beyond-HD journey […]

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The New Second Screen: Live Theater Broadcasts

December 22nd, 2014

The New Second Screen: Live Theater Broadcasts Recorded November 7, LiveTV:LA, Loews Hollywood Hotel, CA. The Metropolitan Opera led the charge in live simulcasts to movie theaters but now pop concerts and other musical performances are following suit. Mark Schubin, SMPTE fellow, discusses how the Metropolitan Opera delivers a rich and compelling experience that has […]

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Everything Else

December 3rd, 2014

Videotape is dying. Whether it will be higher in spatial resolution, frame rate, dynamic range, color gamut, and/or sound immersion; whether it will be delivered to cinema screens, TV sets, smartphones, or virtual-image eye wear; whether it arrives via terrestrial broadcast, satellite, cable, fiber, WiFi, 4G, or something else; the moving-image media of the future […]

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The Fandom of the Opera: How the Audience for a Centuries-Old Art Form Helped Create Modern Media Technology

November 20th, 2014

Presented as part of National Opera Week at Stevens Institute of Technology, College of Arts & Letters, Hoboken, NJ on October 30, 2014. Believe it or not, electronic home entertainment was invented for opera audiences. So were consumer headphones, movies, newscasts, and pay-cable. The first sportscasts were in opera houses. The first wireless broadcast? The […]

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Baseball & Opera? Opera & Baseball?

November 6th, 2014

Recorded Wednesday, October 29, 2014. A free event for National Opera Week 2014 at GoingGoingGoneSports Gallery at the Atrium at Citigroup Center in New York City (with special thanks to Boston Properties and WorldStage). Babe Ruth sang in opera houses.  The manager of the Metropolitan Opera House wears a World Series ring.  Baseball fans started […]

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An Eclectic View of IBC 2014

November 2nd, 2014

On exhibit floors that had products ranging from 8K cameras to automatic captioning, why were many visitors excited about Skype? At a conference where the title of one presentation began “Minimising nonlinear Raman crosstalk,” why did one press report comment on cinema-auditorium lighting and the gross receipts of one episode of one TV show? Between […]

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